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Mary J. Blige credits her music for sobriety

Mary J. Blige credits her music for sobriety

HAPPY AND HEALTHY: Mary J. Blige opens up about her battle with drugs and alcohol. Photo: Associated Press

Mary J. Blige has a new kind of therapy to help keep her sober – she listens to her own songs.

The “No More Drama” hitmaker endured a tough battle with both drugs and alcohol, but now she is clean, she finds solace in listening to the music she made when she was going through the difficult times in her life.

In an interview with Queen Latifah on her show, Blige reveals that while many fans commend her for inspiring them with her music, she feels the same way when listening to her own songs.

She confessed, “This is strange because I normally don’t do this, but I was listening to a lot of my songs. There’s one called Keep Your Head – I wrote that song when I was an alcoholic, doing drugs.

“The words came back to me last night. I was like, ‘Wow – it’s in you. Whatever you are is in you.’ So it was therapeutic to me. It was healing to me. Just like it’s therapeutic and healing to you (fans), it does the same for me.

“So when I’m on the stage and I’m leaving it all there, it’s not just for you – it’s for me too. I’m going in for myself.”

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