Gene Simmons’ chewing gum auctioned off for charity

Gene Simmons’ chewing gum auctioned off for charity

GUM FUN: Gene Simmons' gum is auctioned for a good cause. Photo: Associated Press

KISS frontman Gene Simmons has put his famous tongue to good use – his chewing gum has been auctioned off, raising $245,000 for charity.

The rocker appeared on U.K. TV show Soccer AM last month, when he was challenged to show off some of his signature tongue tricks.

Before demonstrating his skills, Simmons popped a piece of gum out of his mouth and stuck it on the host’s script, saying, “Moms and dads, you may want to hide your children, because I will show you why they call me the king. (Put it on) eBay, eBay.”

Show producers took Simmons’ suggestion and put the used gum on the online auction site, and nearly 100 fans bid on the odd item. The proceeds will go toward the U.K’s Street League Charity, a organization which helps kids through the power of football.

Simmons showed his gratitude for the recipient of the unusual collectors’ item in a statement that reads, “It’s an honor to know that a piece of my chewed gum resulted in a $245,602 donation to benefit young people. Sometimes little things can have big results.”

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