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Fans stage ‘funeral’ for fictional meth kingpin Walter White

Fans stage ‘funeral’ for fictional meth kingpin Walter White

'BAD' FUNERAL: Fans will host a fake funeral for Walter White (right), played by Bryan Cranston. Cranston is seen here with sidekick Jesse Pinkman, played by Aaron Paul. Photo: WENN

A fan farewell to Bryan Cranston’s “Breaking Bad” character is to be streamed live on YouTube.

Devotees of the TV drama, which ended last month, will gather in Albuquerque, New Mexico on Saturday for a memorial to fictional chemistry teacher-turned-drug dealer Walter White – and fans across America will be able to watch the proceedings live.

YouTube bosses have partnered with owners at Vernon’s Steakhouse, who are hosting the post-funeral reception.

The event will also include a memorial tribute to “Breaking Bad” characters Hank Schrader, Steve Gomez and Jane Margolis.

A replica of the “Breaking Bad” RV and the SUV that was part of the scene in which Hank and Gomez were killed will also be driven to the funeral, which is scheduled to start at for 4:30 p.m. local time.

“Breaking Bad” was set and filmed on location in and around the city.

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