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Rockingham Teachers Become Virginia Finalists For National Award

Rockingham Teachers Become Virginia Finalists For National Award

Photo: WINA

Two elementary school teachers from the Shenandoah Valley are Virginia finalists for a national honor. Rockingham County is the employer of Susan Eckenrode of John Wayland Elementary and Eric Imbrescia of Peak View Elementary. They are competing for this year’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science Teaching. Virginia has five finalists for that award, and the other three teachers work in Powhatan County, Giles County, and Fairfax.

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