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Appeals Court Judges Say Ban On Same Sex Marriages Should Go

Appeals Court Judges Say Ban On Same Sex Marriages Should Go

Photo: WINA

A three-judge panel of the Richmond-based Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has added more fuel to the fire over Virginia’s 2006 constitutional ban on same-sex marriages. The panel voted 2-1 to declare that the voter-approved prohibition of gay and lesbian marriages is unconstitutional. One judge who wants to get rid of Virginia’s constitutional amendment is Roger Gregory, who was first appointed by President Clinton. Gregory was joined by Judge Henry Floyd, who was a 2011 appointee of President Obama. The ruling delights Democratic Attorney General Mark Herring (pictured) and gay rights activists such as Reverend Robin Gorsline of Richmond. Victoria Cobb of the Family Foundation of Virginia is upset about the judges’ action. Cobb believes the Commonwealth should continue to define a marriage as the union of one man and one woman.

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