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World’s ‘most interesting man’ joins canine cancer fight

World’s ‘most interesting man’ joins canine cancer fight

MOST INTERESTING MAN AND MAN'S BEST FRIEND: He doesn't always help dogs, but when he does he prefers to help those with cancer. Photo: Associated Press

WILSON RING

MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — The most interesting man in the world is helping a Vermont-based company raise money to fight cancer in dogs.

Jonathan Goldsmith is a Manchester resident made famous by his role in the Dos Equis beer commercials.

But he’s also a dog lover hoping to raise funds for the Denver-based Morris Animal Foundation, which promotes veterinary research for companion animals, horses and wildlife.

Goldsmith made an online commercial with his Anatolian shepherd Willie as part of a campaign by the Manchester-based Orvis Co., which is known for its outdoor apparel and fly fishing but also has a dog catalog.

Goldsmith says he lost a dog to cancer and is glad to support a good cause.

The 75-year-old has appeared in movies and TV shows, including “Charlie’s Angels,” “Magnum, P.I.” and “Dallas.”

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