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Tampa Bay Rays use ‘Jenny’ to pick starting lineup

Tampa Bay Rays use ‘Jenny’ to pick starting lineup

AT LEAST THE SONG WAS A HIT:Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon is seen in the dugout during the second inning of a baseball game against the Detroit Tigers in Detroit, Sunday, July 6. Photo: Associated Press/Carlos Osorio

DETROIT (AP) — Sometimes the manager of a struggling baseball team will resort to pulling the names of his starting lineup out of a hat. But last week, Joe Maddon of the Tampa Bay Rays decided to pull his lineup out of a hit.

Figuring his team would have a tough time against Detroit Tigers ace Max Scherzer, Maddon went with what he calls his “Tommy Tutone lineup” — named after the group’s 1980s hit: “867-5309/Jenny.”

Maddon listed his batting order by position: centerfield, shortstop, left field, third base, first-base, designated hitter and right field. Which, if you’re scoring at home, correspond to 8-6-7-5-3-0-9 — with the zero standing for the designated hitter who, unlike Jenny, doesn’t play the field.

The tactic failed as Scherzer gave up just two hits over 8 innings — and the Tigers won 8-1.

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